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Avibase est un système informatique complet sur toutes les espèces d'oiseaux du monde qui comporte plus de 12 millions de mentions sur 10 000 espèces et 22 000 sous-espèces, incluant des données sur leur distribution, leur taxinomie, des synonymes dans plusieurs langues et bien plus. Ce site est géré par Denis Lepage et hébergé par Études d'Oiseaux Canada, un des partenaires canadiens de Birdlife International. Je travaille sur Avibase depuis environ 1992 et je suis heureux de pouvoir offrir ce site à la communauté ornithologique (amateurs et scientifiques).

© Denis Lepage 2014 - Nombre de mentions contenues dans Avibase: 13 306 909 - Dernière mise à jour: 2014-12-01

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I am excited to announce a new important addition to Avibase, called myAvibase. This is a new section of the site that provides tools for planning your next birding trip and manage your own personal checklists. You can use maps and graphs to quickly see how many species can be found in a given region and at various times of year, for instance. If you import your own sightings in myAvibase, you can also view how many new species (lifers) you could add to your lifelist on your next trip and decide when and where you should go. For some additional details on the types of reports available, please click here.

People who participate in eBird can very simply import their lifelist from their eBird account with a click of a button. MyAvibase also offers more features, such as the ability to chose which taxonomy you want to follow (Clements, IOC, etc.) as well as the ability to compare your lifelist the various lists to each other. Best of all, myAvibase is available for free!. (Please understand however that I am unable to provide personalized support, and may not be able to respond to your requests for assistance).


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2014-12-01: I have now finished incorporating the latest IOC checklist (version 4.04) changes into Avibase. There are, as usual, quite a number of changes, many of which had already been introduced in other taxonomies such as AOU, Clements or Howard and Moore. Among the notable splits, Clapper Rail is split in 3 species (Rallus longirostris, R. crepitans and R. obsoletus), King Rail in 2 species (Rallus elegans and R. tenuirostris), Blue-eared Barbet in 2 species (Psilopogon australis and P. duvaucelii), Brown Barbet in 2 (Caloramphus fuliginosus and C. hayii), Swallow-tailed Cotinga in 2 (Phibalura flavirostris and P. boliviana), Blackish Antbird in 2 (Cercomacra nigrescens and C. fuscicauda), Hooded Whistler in 2 (Pachycephala implicata and P. richardsi), Two-banded Warbler in 2 (Myiothlypis bivittata and M. roraimae, reversing a previous lump), Three-striped Warbler is split in 4 species (Basileuterus tristriatus, B. chitrensis, B. tacarcunae and B. punctipectus), and Baywing is split in 2 (Agelaioides badius and A. fringillarius). There are also a number of scientific name and family assignment changes, as well as a number of modifications affecting subspecies (a majority of which are subspecies that are treated as junior synonyms of other existing subspecies, or species that are now treated as monotypic). One of the more complicated changes involve the treatment of the subspecies peruvianus from the American Coot as a color form of the Slate-colored Coot. For a full comparison of the IOC checklists version 4.03 and 4.04, you can look at the Avibase taxonomic comparison tool. You can also read the taxonomic updates from the IOC web site
 

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